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This privacy policy sets out how Weston Williamson + Partners uses and protects any information that you give us when you use this website. We are committed to ensuring that your privacy is protected. Should we ask you to provide information by which you can be identified when using this website, then you can be assured that it will only be used in accordance with this privacy statement. We may change this policy from time to time by updating this page; please check back from time to time to ensure that you are happy with any changes. This policy is effective from May 1 2018.

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Controlling your personal information

  • You may request details of, or deletion of, personal information which we hold about you under the General Data Protection Regulation 2018. If you would like a copy of the information held on you please telephone the studio on +44 (0) 20 7401 8877

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Chris Williamson

Founding Partner
Connect on Social Media

Happy Birthday Jubilee Line Extension!

It is 20 years since the opening of the Jubilee Line extension - just in time for the Millenium - and city infrastructure schemes are still learning from it.

Bakerloo Line Extension - extending the Polycentric City

At Dubai Cityscape I gave a presentation promoting the advantages of Polycentric Cities citing London as an example. London was formed from small distinct communities such as Chelsea, Dalston, Hampstead and Brixton, which have grown together into a fantastic world city. The extensive underground rail system has helped enormously bind the city together but even now there are distinct communities.

Collaboration

I remember a TV interview with Paul McCartney and (I think) Michael Parkinson where they were discussing the writing of 'I saw her standing there'. McCartney proudly sang his first lines 'She was just seventeen. She could have been a beauty queen’ when John Lennon suggested the second line should be 'You know what I mean'.

In defence of architectural competitions

I’ve just been listening to Carly Simon talking about the writing of 'You're so Vain'. It's a brilliant pop song - in August 2014, the UK's Official Charts Company crowned it the ultimate song of the 1970s. Like most creations it feels as though it came together easily and perfectly.

The Happy City

This month, Kuwait is hosting a symposium on the subject of “Happiness in the City”. The event will provide a unique platform for cultural, creative and technical minds from the UK and the Gulf to explore the issue of how our built environments can be designed to promote happiness and wellbeing. The symposium has been organised by the RIBA in conjunction with the DiT.

Sustainable Air Travel

The emphasis on reducing carbon emissions is forcing all of us to examine the way we travel. Greta Thunberg sailed to New York over 15 days rather than flying in six hours. This is commercially unsustainable for most businesses. But there could be other solutions.

Finding my vocation

Mark Twain said “The two most important days of your life are the day you were born and the day you find out why”. I can’t remember the first but I remember the second as though it was yesterday.

I was 17 and I picked up a book by Derek Senior in the school library called ‘Your Architect’. I was attracted to it initially by the cover and the fantastic illustrations throughout by David Rock.

The Future of Architects

Last month I took part in a seminar organised by Blueprint Magazine on the Future of the Architect. I started my presentation with the classic image of Buzz Aldrin of Apollo 11 on the surface of the moon. I was 12 at the time of the Apollo 11 mission and that single event made a lasting impression on me, along with a belief that we as a race can conquer any obstacle to achieve our ambitions.

User experience and feedback is vital to improving our cities

Many architects view the completion of their projects as the day the building is handed over and they move on to other things. The shop has opened for trading, the occupants have moved in to the office, the builders have moved out of the house, the snagging done, the final completion certificate issued. Like an artist who finishes a painting, sells it and never sees it again, we get sucked in to the project and when it has “ended”, seldom give it another thought or learn other than immediate superficial lessons from it.

My Marathon

I started the run at 10.20am at Greenwich knowing that I would be running for the next 4-5 hours, which is a daunting prospect. It had been 14 years since my last marathon and although I had trained for this I suddenly felt very nervous.  But looking around me, I realised that everyone else would be experiencing the same emotions and gradually started to relax. 

Let's make New York streets healthier and more enjoyable

Recently, when visiting New York for the first time in five years, it struck me how little things had improved for pedestrians.

Marathon running: it's all in the mind

I have been asked to write about how my training is going for the London Marathon. The short answer is okay. The real answer is nuanced and complicated.

Alcohol free is really the bee's knees

In order to prepare for the London Marathon I managed an alcohol free ‘dry’ January and actually enjoyed it so much I continued into February and March and have decided to avoid alcohol for the rest of the year. It’s actually surprising and reassuring how easy it’s been for these first few months. 

On running, teamwork and the power of exercise

Training for this year’s London Marathon, which Chris is running in aid of the Architects Benevolent Society, has given him plenty of time to think… 

RIBA international charrette series

On March 8, young architects from Allies and Morrison and Hawkins\Brown joined those from WW+P for a live streamed design workshop, organised by RIBA International Vice President Chris Williamson. 

London First: Is London ready for its first mile high building?

Chris Williamson will be exploring innovative typologies for tall buildings and possible sites for London's first mile high tower at our co-hosted panel discussion at Transport for London, 55 Broadway, Westminster SW1, on Thursday November 8, 6.00-8.30pm.

Why choose an architect when you can choose a RIBA architect?

British architects are held in high esteem throughout the world, due not only to a track record of excellent design, but the combination of business skills, commitment to ethical values and a pedigree of experience and knowledge.  The UK is the biggest exporter of architectural talent ahead of any other nation.  

Brexit Diaries: Chris Williamson

Chris Williamson has been a regular contributor to Archinect’s Brexit Diaries series. You can read his blogs here and if you share his views or would like to air your own, please contact him or via twitter @cw_architect.

When Chris was asked to work with Andrew Weston for group projects at Leicester School of Architecture (for no other reason than they were next to each other alphabetically) he discovered that their skills didn’t overlap but dovetailed perfectly. Their shared ambition made for a perfect business partnership.

Forty years later Chris manages and directs the studio and has recently published WW+P’s vision for the next 20 years, which talks about a diverse, collaborative design studio with strong delivery skills.

In addition to being a chartered architect, Chris has an MSc in Project Management and believes strongly that the art of architecture requires excellent business skills in order to be realised. Chris is currently the International Vice President of the RIBA responsible for setting a strategy to grow into a global membership institution and to encourage more UK architects to seek work globally. Read more of Chris's thoughts via his twitter page.



Happy Birthday Jubilee Line Extension!

It is 20 years since the opening of the Jubilee Line extension - just in time for the Millenium - and city infrastructure schemes are still learning from it.

Bakerloo Line Extension - extending the Polycentric City

At Dubai Cityscape I gave a presentation promoting the advantages of Polycentric Cities citing London as an example. London was formed from small distinct communities such as Chelsea, Dalston, Hampstead and Brixton, which have grown together into a fantastic world city. The extensive underground rail system has helped enormously bind the city together but even now there are distinct communities.

Collaboration

I remember a TV interview with Paul McCartney and (I think) Michael Parkinson where they were discussing the writing of 'I saw her standing there'. McCartney proudly sang his first lines 'She was just seventeen. She could have been a beauty queen’ when John Lennon suggested the second line should be 'You know what I mean'.

In defence of architectural competitions

I’ve just been listening to Carly Simon talking about the writing of 'You're so Vain'. It's a brilliant pop song - in August 2014, the UK's Official Charts Company crowned it the ultimate song of the 1970s. Like most creations it feels as though it came together easily and perfectly.

The Happy City

This month, Kuwait is hosting a symposium on the subject of “Happiness in the City”. The event will provide a unique platform for cultural, creative and technical minds from the UK and the Gulf to explore the issue of how our built environments can be designed to promote happiness and wellbeing. The symposium has been organised by the RIBA in conjunction with the DiT.

Sustainable Air Travel

The emphasis on reducing carbon emissions is forcing all of us to examine the way we travel. Greta Thunberg sailed to New York over 15 days rather than flying in six hours. This is commercially unsustainable for most businesses. But there could be other solutions.

Finding my vocation

Mark Twain said “The two most important days of your life are the day you were born and the day you find out why”. I can’t remember the first but I remember the second as though it was yesterday.

I was 17 and I picked up a book by Derek Senior in the school library called ‘Your Architect’. I was attracted to it initially by the cover and the fantastic illustrations throughout by David Rock.

The Future of Architects

Last month I took part in a seminar organised by Blueprint Magazine on the Future of the Architect. I started my presentation with the classic image of Buzz Aldrin of Apollo 11 on the surface of the moon. I was 12 at the time of the Apollo 11 mission and that single event made a lasting impression on me, along with a belief that we as a race can conquer any obstacle to achieve our ambitions.

User experience and feedback is vital to improving our cities

Many architects view the completion of their projects as the day the building is handed over and they move on to other things. The shop has opened for trading, the occupants have moved in to the office, the builders have moved out of the house, the snagging done, the final completion certificate issued. Like an artist who finishes a painting, sells it and never sees it again, we get sucked in to the project and when it has “ended”, seldom give it another thought or learn other than immediate superficial lessons from it.

My Marathon

I started the run at 10.20am at Greenwich knowing that I would be running for the next 4-5 hours, which is a daunting prospect. It had been 14 years since my last marathon and although I had trained for this I suddenly felt very nervous.  But looking around me, I realised that everyone else would be experiencing the same emotions and gradually started to relax. 

Let's make New York streets healthier and more enjoyable

Recently, when visiting New York for the first time in five years, it struck me how little things had improved for pedestrians.

Marathon running: it's all in the mind

I have been asked to write about how my training is going for the London Marathon. The short answer is okay. The real answer is nuanced and complicated.

Alcohol free is really the bee's knees

In order to prepare for the London Marathon I managed an alcohol free ‘dry’ January and actually enjoyed it so much I continued into February and March and have decided to avoid alcohol for the rest of the year. It’s actually surprising and reassuring how easy it’s been for these first few months. 

On running, teamwork and the power of exercise

Training for this year’s London Marathon, which Chris is running in aid of the Architects Benevolent Society, has given him plenty of time to think… 

RIBA international charrette series

On March 8, young architects from Allies and Morrison and Hawkins\Brown joined those from WW+P for a live streamed design workshop, organised by RIBA International Vice President Chris Williamson. 

London First: Is London ready for its first mile high building?

Chris Williamson will be exploring innovative typologies for tall buildings and possible sites for London's first mile high tower at our co-hosted panel discussion at Transport for London, 55 Broadway, Westminster SW1, on Thursday November 8, 6.00-8.30pm.

Why choose an architect when you can choose a RIBA architect?

British architects are held in high esteem throughout the world, due not only to a track record of excellent design, but the combination of business skills, commitment to ethical values and a pedigree of experience and knowledge.  The UK is the biggest exporter of architectural talent ahead of any other nation.  

Brexit Diaries: Chris Williamson

Chris Williamson has been a regular contributor to Archinect’s Brexit Diaries series. You can read his blogs here and if you share his views or would like to air your own, please contact him or via twitter @cw_architect.

How can we help?

Please get in touch if you’d like to know more about us and how we work with our clients, consultants and colleagues.